Blackmores Cranberry 15000 for Urinary Tract Infection

Blackmores Cranberry 15000 Review

Dylan Wingate
What Is Blackmores Cranberry 15000? Cranberry 15000 is our natural supplement under review today. It has been formulated to treat urinary tract infections, which are more common in men than women, mostly due to physiology. In women, the rectum is closer to the urethral opening, increasing the chances of a…
- 7
- 6.5
- 7.5
- 5.5
- 6.5

6.6

User Rating: 3 ( 122 votes)
3 5

What Is Blackmores Cranberry 15000?

Cranberry 15000 is our natural supplement under review today. It has been formulated to treat urinary tract infections, which are more common in men than women, mostly due to physiology. In women, the rectum is closer to the urethral opening, increasing the chances of a bacteria such as e.coli making its way into the urethra and bladder, and multiplying. When there’s a lower urinary tract infection, you’ll feel abdominal burning, pressure and discomfort, a strong urge to urinate frequently, and you urine may also be discolored.

Other causes of UTIs are sexual intercourse, weak immune systems, catheter use and drinking too few liquids to flush out the system. If you have blood in your urine you have an upper UTI and should seek medical help immediately.

Blackmores says that its Cranberry 15000 supplement is a concentrated, strong cranberry extract to promote urinary tract health and which may help eliminate cystitis.

Ingredients

Studies indicate that the proanthocyanidins in cranberries decrease the number of recurring UTIs over time and ease cystitis symptoms, even though they probably do not cure the UTI completely. These are only found in raw cranberries, and much of it is lost when you consume cranberry juice. The issue of preventing bacteria such as e.coli from clinging to the lower tract walls is significant, as this is how this bacteria colonises the tract boldly enough to create an infection. It sticks to other bacteria there already present, but which would normally not result in UTI symptoms. It you cut off the ability to latch on to other bacteria, you deprive bugs such as e.coli from spreading and multiplying. Cranberry also prevents bacteria from happily nesting in the lining of the stomach, gums, teeth and mouth tissue.

Dosage

Take 1 capsule 1 to 2 times a day with meals, or as professionally prescribed, if you’re over 12. If under 12, consult a medical professional first. Cranberry may increase the risk of bleeding with warfarin, so consult your doctor first if you’re on warfarin.

What Is The Cost?

There are 60 capsules in a bottle, with one bottle costing $28.14. This is quite high compared to similar supplements. The cost per bottle represents your supply for one or two months.

Manufacturer’s Guarantee

There does not appear to be a returns policy. The manufacturer is in Australia and not local, so the shipping fees and returns policy is of particular importance to US consumers.

Our Final Review Of Blackmores Cranberry 15000

It seems clear from studies that blackberries go at least some way towards easing bladder infections. This is especially true if taken long term to create a barrier to bacteria latching on to the bladder or gut lining long term.

However, at 300 mg concentrate, Cranberry 15000 is undoubtedly expensive. We have found that it costs four times as much as similar supplements containing 400 mg cranberry extract. This means the reservation with this supplement is cost as well as efficiency. The latest research since 2014 has shown the metabolite and phytochemicals in cranberry to be ineffective as a stand-alone UTI treatment – while it goes away towards suppressing bacterial colonization of the bladder, it does not rid the tract of the likes of e.coli or prevent re-colonization completely. You need the addition of other fighters such as d-mannose, among other things. Although you therefore use this supplement as an aid in your UTI-fighting regimen if you have a high budget, also bear in mind that without a returns policy, you are vulnerable should you need money-back coverage for whatever reason.


© Copyright 2018 Review Critic All Rights Reserved · reviewcritic.org